Japanese Knotweed FAQs

Japanese Knotweed FAQs

How do I prevent japanese knotweed spreading?

Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica) spreads through fragments of rhizome and cut stems, capable of producing new shoots and roots when buried in soil. It only takes a piece of rhizome the size of a finger nail to generate into a new plant. This material can be carried far and wide, completely un-noticed on the sole of a shoe or the tracks of construction vehicles. If Japanese knotweed growth has been discovered it is important not to attempt to move or break the stems or uproot the plant. Take measures to prevent access to the infestation.

What if I have knotweed growing next door?

This is probably the most common knotweed problem. Property sales have fallen through over knotweed that was not the responsibility of the seller. Litigation, or pursuing action under The Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 are always options, but any such action should be seen as a last resort. It is always better to try and resolve the matter amicably with your neighbour if at all possible. Where knotweed is growing across boundaries and affecting more than one property it is always better, if feasible, to treat the knotweed as a single entity, regardless of ownership of the land it is growing on. This requires co‐operation between all parties involved, though everyone will benefit from it if such co‐operation can be achieved. If the knotweed is eradicated as a whole, then all properties will be become more saleable as a result. If knotweed remains untreated on one property, then it will always present a risk of spreading back into treated properties in the future.

Where is Japanese knotweed from?

Fallopia japonica, commonly known as Japanese knotweed, is a large, herbaceous perennial plant of the family Polygonaceae, native to East Asia in Japan, China and Korea. In North America and Europe the species is very successful and has been classified as an invasive species in several countries.

Is Japanese Knotweed poisonous?

No, in fact there are many recipes available on the internet containing knotweed, ranging from soups to knotweed and apple crumble.

How fast does Japanese Knotweed grow?

It is described by the Environment Agency as ‘indisputably the UK’s most aggressive, destructive and invasive plant’. Here are the facts:

It can grow 10cm a day (20cm at its most prolific).
In just 10 weeks its stem can reach 3-4 metres (that’s the height of at least two human beings). Underground, the rhizomes – the mass of roots – are also growing and can spread up to 7 metres horizontally and 3 metres deep.

How did Japanese knotweed get into this country?

The victorians brought it over as a fast growing livestock feed.

How Do I Prevent Japanese Knotweed Spreading?

Japanese knotweed spreads through fragments of rhizome and cut stems, capable of producing new shoots and roots when buried in soil. It only takes a piece of rhizome the size of a finger nail to generate into a new plant. This material can be carried far and wide, completely un-noticed on the sole of a shoe or the tracks of construction vehicles. If Japanese knotweed growth has been discovered it is important not to attempt to move or break the stems or uproot the plant. Take measures to prevent access to the infestation

I think I’ve got Japanese Knotweed in my garden. What should I do about it?

The most important thing is not to panic! The first thing to do is to make sure that it us Japanese Knotweed in your garden. Click here to find out how to identify Japanses knotweed or click here to send us a message. If you would prefer to complete our online form them you can find it here.

What if I know that Japanese knotweed

If you find out that Japanese knotweed is in your neighbours land, you should speak to them straight away. Without trying to cause an arguement, explain to your neighbour why Japanese Knotweed can be an issue. Your neighbours may not understand the seriousness of the problem and from our experience, it's really common to find that most people do not know what Japanese Knotweed is or how serious the problem can become.

How do I dispose of Japanese knotweed?

Do not remove it from your garden unless you take it to a site that will is happy to receive it and you have a valid Waste Carriers Licence. When you do remove the plant, do not cut the stems without treating the roots. Doing this ecourages the plant to take on more nutrients and this enhances the growthof the plat a lot.

Sources:

http://japaneseknotweed.com/japanese-knotweed-faqs/
http://www.japaneseknotweedspecialists.com/faq/
http://www.knotweed-uk.com/FAQ.html
http://www.knotweed-removal.co.uk/faq-frequently-asked-questions-about-japanese-knotweed.php

 

Japanese Knotweed
FAQs

Read the most common questions about Japanese knotweed here and find out many of the common answers. Us this page as your start in the battle against Japanese Knotweed.

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What is Japanese Knotweed?

Japanese Knotweed (Fallopia japonica) was introduced to Britain togetin the middle of XIX century as an ornamental garden plant. It was first described by Dutch naturalist Maarten Houttuyn in 1777 from Japan under the name Reynoutria japonica.

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How to identify Japanese Knotweed

Japanese knotweed emerges as small shoots green/purple in colour. As the plant develops it produces small shield-shaped leaves growing from the stem's many sticking out nodules or knots. Once it's grown in to maturity, the leaves turn bright green colour and can grow to over 100cm in length.

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Japanese Knotweed treatment services

Japanese knotweed infestations can be eliminated through a variety of methods. Depending on factors such as the time you have, the location of the infestation and the environment it's found in the method can vary. Through correct application, Japanese knotweed growth can be limited and prevented from coming back.

Find out more here